Category Archives: Digital Media

LDAP Alfresco (global properties)
Date Created: December 8, 2015  Date Modified: January 17, 2016

I found this useful so I thought I’d post it

authentication.chain=alfrescoNtlm1:alfrescoNtlm,ldap1:ldap

# This flag enables use of this LDAP subsystem for authentication. It may be
# that this subsytem should only be used for synchronization, in which case
# this flag should be set to false.
ldap.authentication.active=true

#
# This properties file brings together the common options for LDAP authentication rather than editing the bean definitions
#
ldap.authentication.allowGuestLogin=true

# How to map the user id entered by the user to that passed through to LDAP
ldap.authentication.userNameFormat=uid=%s,ou=users,dc=armundia,dc=com

# The LDAP context factory to use
ldap.authentication.java.naming.factory.initial=com.sun.jndi.ldap.LdapCtxFactory

# The URL to connect to the LDAP server
ldap.authentication.java.naming.provider.url=ldap://ldap.....com:389

# The authentication mechanism to use for password validation
ldap.authentication.java.naming.security.authentication=simple

# Escape commas entered by the user at bind time
# Useful when using simple authentication and the CN is part of the DN and contains commas
ldap.authentication.escapeCommasInBind=false

# Escape commas entered by the user when setting the authenticated user
# Useful when using simple authentication and the CN is part of the DN and contains commas, and the escaped \, is
# pulled in as part of an LDAP sync

# If this option is set to true it will break the default home folder provider as space names can not contain \
ldap.authentication.escapeCommasInUid=false

# Comma separated list of user names who should be considered administrators by default
ldap.authentication.defaultAdministratorUserNames=....

# This flag enables use of this LDAP subsystem for user and group
# synchronization. It may be that this subsytem should only be used for
# authentication, in which case this flag should be set to false.
ldap.synchronization.active=true

# The authentication mechanism to use for synchronization
ldap.synchronization.java.naming.security.authentication=simple

# The default principal to use (only used for LDAP sync)
ldap.synchronization.java.naming.security.principal=cn\=ldap,dc\=armundia,dc\=com

# The password for the default principal (only used for LDAP sync)
ldap.synchronization.java.naming.security.credentials=.....

# If positive, this property indicates that RFC 2696 paged results should be
# used to split query results into batches of the specified size. This
# overcomes any size limits imposed by the LDAP server.
ldap.synchronization.queryBatchSize=0

# If positive, this property indicates that range retrieval should be used to fetch
# multi-valued attributes (such as member) in batches of the specified size.
# Overcomes any size limits imposed by Active Directory.
ldap.synchronization.attributeBatchSize=0

# The query to select all objects that represent the groups to import.
ldap.synchronization.groupQuery=(objectclass\=groupOfNames)

# The query to select objects that represent the groups to import that have changed since a certain time.
ldap.synchronization.groupDifferentialQuery=(&(objectclass\=groupOfNames)(!(modifyTimestamp<\={0}))) # The query to select all objects that represent the users to import. ldap.synchronization.personQuery=(objectclass\=inetOrgPerson) # The query to select objects that represent the users to import that have changed since a certain time. ldap.synchronization.personDifferentialQuery=(&(objectclass\=inetOrgPerson)(!(modifyTimestamp<\={0}))) # The group search base restricts the LDAP group query to a sub section of tree on the LDAP server. ldap.synchronization.groupSearchBase=dc\=roles,dc\=alfresco,dc\=armundia,dc\=com # The user search base restricts the LDAP user query to a sub section of tree on the LDAP server. ldap.synchronization.userSearchBase=dc\=users,dc\=armundia,dc\=com # The name of the operational attribute recording the last update time for a group or user. ldap.synchronization.modifyTimestampAttributeName=modifyTimestamp # The timestamp format. Unfortunately, this varies between directory servers. ldap.synchronization.timestampFormat=yyyyMMddHHmmss'Z' # The attribute name on people objects found in LDAP to use as the uid in Alfresco ldap.synchronization.userIdAttributeName=uid # The attribute on person objects in LDAP to map to the first name property in Alfresco ldap.synchronization.userFirstNameAttributeName=givenName # The attribute on person objects in LDAP to map to the last name property in Alfresco ldap.synchronization.userLastNameAttributeName=sn # The attribute on person objects in LDAP to map to the email property in Alfresco ldap.synchronization.userEmailAttributeName=mail # The attribute on person objects in LDAP to map to the organizational id property in Alfresco ldap.synchronization.userOrganizationalIdAttributeName=o # The default home folder provider to use for people created via LDAP import ldap.synchronization.defaultHomeFolderProvider=largeHomeFolderProvider # The attribute on LDAP group objects to map to the authority name property in Alfresco ldap.synchronization.groupIdAttributeName=cn # The attribute on LDAP group objects to map to the authority display name property in Alfresco ldap.synchronization.groupDisplayNameAttributeName=description # The group type in LDAP ldap.synchronization.groupType=groupOfNames # The person type in LDAP ldap.synchronization.personType=inetOrgPerson # The attribute in LDAP on group objects that defines the DN for its members ldap.synchronization.groupMemberAttributeName=member # If true progress estimation is enabled. When enabled, the user query has to be run twice in order to count entries. ldap.synchronization.enableProgressEstimation=true # Requests timeout, in miliseconds, use 0 for none (default) ldap.authentication.java.naming.read.timeout=0

Source:
https://forums.alfresco.com/forum/installation-upgrades-configuration-integration/authentication-ldap-sso/ldap-authentication-7

[REPORT] The Google books settlement: a private contract in the absence of adequate copyright law
Date Created: January 10, 2013  Date Modified: January 10, 2013

I missed work yesturday so I had a lot of catching up to do today, this piked my interest because it references Lessig in the first sentence (and we all love Law professors who can internet like a pro). I will give it a more indepth read tonight when I have a bit more time…

The Google Books settlement has been hailed as an audacious and brilliant move by proponents and critics alike (Lessig, 2010; Samuelson, 2009a). Google’s goal of digitizing up to 20 million books drawn from participating libraries has been recast to cut authors and publishers in on the deal. With one comprehensive and complex legal document, Google, the Authors Guild, and the Association of American Publishers have crafted a deal that could transform the digital marketplace for books and could give Google a legal—and exclusive—method to clear rights for some copyrighted works neither it nor anyone else could acquire any other way, excepting changes to U.S. copyright legislation. The following discussion considers the circumstances that led to this settlement and explores its primary components, focusing on the amended class action settlement agreement of November 13, 2009, which in many respects remains similar to the original agreement of October 28, 2008. The settlement makes positive steps in the tricky areas of public access and digital rights, but it remains open to serious legal, economic, and cultural criticisms.
http://src-online.ca/index.php/src/article/viewFile/29/44

[REPORT] Digital Freedoms in International Law
Date Created: October 29, 2012  Date Modified: October 29, 2012

Released Monday from Global Network Initiative, is the following report Digital Freedoms in International Law, which addresses many of the issues relating to protecting human rights on-line. It looks into state driven censorship in oppressive regimes such as Saudi Arabia and it also highlights the lack of accountability corporations have in the digital eco-system when it comes to human rights violations:

…there are special problems in applying law generally, and human rights law in particular, to the new global, digital environment. Laws are still mainly drawn up for an environment with clearly defined territorial jurisdictions. And much of the control over the Internet rests in the hands of private companies, whereas traditional human rights law almost entirely focused on states. This raises problems of both “prescriptive” and “enforcement” jurisdiction, and of “privatised” (or semi-­-privatised) law enforcement, without adequate remedies.
Page 14

Also mentioned is the corporate sectors willingness to comply with take down requests, and that they have a moral obligation not to facilitate such:

companies should think in advance of possible risks arising from undue state demands made upon them, and they should take measures – including technical measures – to try and make it possible for them to deny or at least minimise their cooperation. They must afterwards help the victims of their enforced cooperation with such allegedly undue and illegal state actions, to alleviate the harm done as much as possible.
Page 23

I would however suggest that it is the corporate interests manipulating the states; tho this might be me speaking from a political, rather than a legal perspective.

Game Design Doc
Date Created: September 21, 2012  Date Modified: October 7, 2012

I was on Scribd earlier for an unrelated reason and thought I would have a look at the stats on my acount; the document that recived the most hits winning its own post:

Game Design Document iCricket

This rant was posted in Assignment, Digital Distribution on by .

[LINK] It’s complicated: copyright law and chaos theory
Date Created: September 12, 2012  Date Modified: September 12, 2012

Journal of Intellectual Property Law & Practice – Advance Access

via It's complicated: copyright law and chaos theory.

A sad week for freedom(s)…
Date Created: August 16, 2012  Date Modified: August 20, 2012

Earlier today I noticed a tweet from Wikileaks press mentioning a helicopter above the Ecuadorian Embassy. I had bee at uni all morning and had been in communication with business stakeholders most afternoon (tho I DID get time to do some work on the car). I had not checked Google Reader, Heard a television, smelled a newspaper of digested any form of media other than the multitude of billboard advertising decorating the bus shelters along South Street. This tweet was the first I had heard of what was part of one of the worst weeks for our online freedoms. I was aware earlier in the week of the governments willingness to push through parliament the Cybercrime Legislation Amendment Bill 2011 on Wednesday (turns out I had the date incorrect, its Wednesday the 22nd). But then to have one of, not only Australia’s, but the worlds pioneering hacktivists this was surely one sad week for online freedom.

The implications extend beyond the protocol, IRL will suffer too. The implications of the UK revoking the Ecuadorian Embassy’s status, not only would be seen as an act of war by the Ecuadorians; As their Foreign Minister was quoted on the BBC as saying:

“If the measure announced in the British official communication is enacted, it will be interpreted by Ecuador as an unacceptable, unfriendly and hostile act and as an attempt against our sovereignty. It would force us to respond.

But also this action, the evoking of the Diplomatic and Consular Premises Act 1987 UK, would in effect undermining the authority of protection offered to all diplomatic envoys, regardless of host nation or nation of origin. I would like to follow this story more but am a bit time precious tonight, I hope I dont start consuming media again on the weekend and find out that–EVERYTHING IS FINE, PLEASE CARRY ON WITH YOUR DAILY ROUTINE.

UPDATE: the following url is to the wikileaks insurance file, all 64Gb of it!:
https://thepiratebay.se/torrent/7050943/WikiLeaks_Insurance_release_02-22-2012. I will be following this story on twitter and be re-tweeting support messages for Assange (While trying to fit some required reading form my Law workshop tomorrow.)

Lawyers hate HTML
Date Created: August 1, 2012  Date Modified: December 27, 2012

I had my first Law lecture this morning, prior I was in the Murdoch Bookshop stacking up on some tomes I will be needing on this endeavour (and a couple more I just wanted to get). I got home enthused to start reading this new type of littérateur that I will be battling over the next few years, and heeding the advice of my lecturer: That it takes a little bit of a learning curve to get use to legal writing, I decided to start on one of the law books that wasnt part of my required reading material, but was something that I felt more palatable for someone with my background in web–Internet and E-Commerce Law, Business and Policy.

Imediatly I scanned the contents for a topic that I could relate to; Chapter 6 – Domain names and trade marks. Reading the section on WHOIS was where I started. Everyone who works web knows WHOIS, so reading this very legal run-down of something that we as webbys take for granted is… refreshing in a sense. Then I got all academic on the shit and I saw the real problem–well from my pedantic web paradigm anyway. I went to look up one of the references in the United States-Australia Free Trade Agreement, Art 17.3.2 and clicking on that link you see why Im pissed off. Numbered paragraphs that should be ordered lists!, no text anchors!, emphasis where it should be italic!. These things matter if this were a published print document; all hell would break loose if this were printed like this. But on the web, do the document custodians care? Are they even aware that HTML markup can be used to present the information in a more accessible manner?.

I am yet to look into W3C giudelines for web content; due however to the differing nature of legal style requirements in jurisdictions arount the world, I doubt an international standard could be reached specifically relating to Acts. Surely tho, the same W3C guidelines for ordered lists on other web content would apply to the layout of a legal document?. Emphasis and Italic however I see it as a breach, an Act must be written in italics by legal style convention (law?), not emphasised when read or interpreted by a text reader. What this neglect in the article of the USAFTA linked is a clear neglect the legal community have for the web community, or at least HTML.

UPDATE: When going over some online sesources provided for the unit, I came accross the below image. Please feel free to comment.

Image to point out the Short Title of an Act

There was no Alt text , title, or description of this image on the LMS.

An image to outline the correct citing of cases

This image was much worse not only did it not contain any attributes in the HTML to assist, it could have been built as a simple interactive app that would be able to meet an accessable standard

[VIDEO] How could have I missed this on rights-free?
Date Created: June 2, 2012  Date Modified: July 5, 2012

Hindsight helps a lot; I would have really liked to have embeded this in the original Digital Distribution essay post…

But thats the thing with hindsight and deadlines.

This rant was posted in Creative Commons, Digital Distribution, Music, Video on by .

New Media and Democracy: Wayback Machine
Date Created: September 23, 2011  Date Modified: April 9, 2012

I love archive.org, I go there an nab rights-free media all the time, and their wayback machine is a very useful tol for web designers and administrators to compare UI/UX changes over a long period of time–I used this many times when working at UNDA to highlight usability and design improvements I implemented (and once to recover a “missing” page, but thats another story…

However I never expected, possibly out of a narrow-mindset; that wayback would be defending our free expression of ideas, from Graham Readfearn (An Onymous Lefty):

A few days ago, when I was researching this piece for DeSmogBlog about the questionable coverage of climate change science by The Australian newspaper, I found that none of the links to my old News Ltd blog – GreenBlog – were working.
To be precise, the links worked, but there was no content on the pages. Just a white screen where about 650 posts and 14,000 comments used to be.
The record of an online blog session with then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd? Gone. The full Q&A with former UN general secretary Kofi Annan? Gone. My catalogue of critiques of News Ltd’s climate denial bloggers, Tim Blair and Andrew Bolt? All gone.

Obviously News Ltd’s editorial guidelines decided that the particular content did not reflect the values and opinions of Rupert Murdoch so they 404’ed it. But wayback, being impartial (as I am aware the crawlers do not hold any political opinion, but correct me if I am wrong) has saved some of the content–and even discussion of the above.

Kudos to wayback for protecting our political speach, lets just hope they dont end up permanb& when the cleanfeed kicks in. Of course its not just the media moguls who have editorial discression over the tubez, Google themselves have been known to remove content without explanation, remember to read the ToS.

New Media and Democracy: The Troll King
Date Created: September 19, 2011  Date Modified: September 22, 2011

In a follow-up to my post from earlier re: Political Trolls, last night the ABC’s Four Corners aired this piece on the climate change debate called “The Climate Wars”. I think the following quote from Liberal Senator Cory Bernardi really sums up the current political climate over new media:

I’ve always sought to build a movement, not an empire. I want as many, you know, like-minded groups out there advocating for what they think is important – not what Cory Bernardi thinks is important.

If they’ve got a good idea about a blog or you know an activism initiative that they want to pursue, if I’ve got the money and the resources to help them, I will do that.

Now, I don’t necessarily have to agree with everything they do or everything they say. I just want people to get out there and have a go.

The entire article is below (thanks to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

So basically yes, the fascist dogs are manipulating the media to their own agenda, and its up to us to do something about it… then this morning the ABC aired a programme about Phone Phreaking and the early days of hacking–maybe the ABC is trying to manipulate me to go after these shites!. (BTW: the Sydney Morning Herald is a sharepoint driven site so dont even bother going after Andrew “Im a fuckwit” Bolt.

After all, it was those inflammatory remarks from right-wing retards which caused me to disable my Facebook.

Essay: Digital Distribution
Date Created: September 16, 2011  Date Modified: September 21, 2012

READERS NOTE: This is my original work was originally posted on my no-longer active Murdoch blog on April 14th, 2010.

I have decided to post my MCC124 essay here on the blog so you may comment and critisize it. Its fairly short of the required 1500 words so I dont expect to be given a high mark for it. Before I paste it into here I would like to share a quote from the song “Evolution” by 311:

Evolution has expontential timing it’ll be
Half as long til the next breakthrough that
blows are mind
It’s up to the people to brave on with
experimentation
Move forth the species by using our
imagination

But can we handle it
Could we dismantle it
Or should we fear the void and just be
para-paranoid
If it’s understood it could be used for good
and would
If you will believe in all we can conceive

Describe the impact of piracy, p2p and/or file sharing on the digital distribution of media.

In 2007 Radiohead, a popular musical act released their seventh studio album, In Rainbows in a way not seen before from such a well known musical, act: They made their album available to download, at a cost decided by the consumer, from the bands website—as well as making a hard copy available to be purchased by fans in conventional music stores1. It was big music conceding defeat in the digital distribution war.

The distribution of media through piracy, even p2p is not a new phenomenon. Video piracy was widespread with the consumer availability of VHS recorders, software piracy plagued developers since programming shifted from hard-coded chips to the floppy disk, and music piracy was no different2. With technological advances come new methods of breaking the law, it must follow then that legislation needs to keep up-to-date with emerging technological trends.

Digital distribution of music was not a new concept for the music industry3 in 2007, the time this white surrender flag was waved. By 2007 the case of Napster was long in the past and Apple’s iTunes store was now five years old. The music listening public had made their choice and it was up to the artists and record labels to catch up—people were not going to stop downloading music, (no matter what the cost?).

Not so much that’s it was the musicians themselves, as most of them shared their voice with the people in the battle cry for digital distribution, Acts as diverse as pop music’s Moby4 and Prince; New Metal band Slipknot; and the anti-establishment political rap group Public Enemy5 had been long advocates of digital distribution; In the case of Public Enemy, this stance put them up against their own label: Def Jam6. The record label, the face of the enemy.

Recording companies were the biggest opponents of digital distribution, primarily because it was seen to undermine their position in the music industry heavyweights, the generals and brigadiers leading their elite squads of musical acts in the pursuit of money and fame. The record companies saw digital distribution as synonymous with piracy and responded with legal actions against its proponents—both those end users downloading music, but also those that put in place the infrastructure to accomplish this.

Sony was one recording company that had tried, and failed horribly to counter digital distribution in 2005 with their DRM software7. People who had brought compact disks legitimately, were the casualties, a root-kit installed on a users computer once the CD was inserted into the optical drive, making the users computer vulnerable to malicious code. It was the wrong approach, for the kids of generation Y, downloading music was seen as a rebellion against an over-zealous corporate establishment8. Punishment for rebellion would only prove counter productive.

Apple, makers of designer electronics, had taken a different tact. Unlike Sony, Apple did not see digital distribution as a threat to their existing business model. Apple may not have had the massive back catalogue of music it owned rights to, but it did have dominance over the MP3 player market, so the choice to embrace digital distribution with its iTunes store could be seen as less of a risk. By October 2007, Apple had secured rights to distribute “digital” boxed sets from 1970’s super group Led Zeppelin9, people would still download music, even if they did have to pay for it.

Legislation was seen as something that needed to be brought into line with the emerging technologies, legislation that was fair to both user, creator and publisher. After the Napster case hit US courts, a “Digital Recording Act” was proposed10. Without a legal framework corporate interests would still look at digital distribution with an eye of mistrust, they needed a guarantee of return-of-investment on their stockpile of music11.

What the success of the Apple model of distribution, over Sony’s DRM failure taught musicians was that the old paradigm of selling music was becoming obsolete, and it followed that the record companies themselves were obsolete. Artists could do away with the corporate drill, and take on their own means of getting their music to their audience. Bands had taken on this endeavor before, as militant anti-government rap group Public Enemy had done. But popular music had yet to free itself from the corporate hierarchy—that was until an internationally known pop band Radiohead released “In Rainbows”, in its first month online over a million copies were downloaded taking US$3 million, from 40% of those users choosing to pay. At an average of $6(US)12, proving digital distribution can still be lucrative for the artist.

What the significance of In Rainbows had to the digital distribution of media was not a technological one, but a larger cultural paradigm shift. Indy bands, and militant rappers had embraced the technology before, but this was confined to smaller sub-cultures. The mass adoption of digital distribution had been proven effective, and it wasn’t until In Rainbows was this acknowledged by anyone from within the corporate music mainstream. This act meant not that the battle lines had been redrawn, but that the war was finally over.


References

  1. Wikipedia, “In Rainbows” en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Rainbows
  2. Kembrew McLeod, 2005, “MP3s Are Killing Home Taping: The Rise of Internet Distribution and Its Challenge to the Major Label Music Monopoly”
  3. Sean Ebare, 2004, “Digital music and subculture: Sharing files sharing styles”
  4. Moby, “Napster” 2001 www.moby.com/journal/2001-01-29/napster.html
  5. John Borland, 2000, “Rapper Chuck-D throws his weight behind Napster” news.cnet.com/2100-1023-239917.html
  6. MTV News, 2000 “Public Enemy Leaves Def Jam, Will Distribute Next Album Online” www.mtv.com/news/articles/1427080/19990114/chuck_d.jhtml
  7. Molly Wood, 2005, Cnet News, “DRM This!” www.cnet.com/4520-6033_1-6376177-1.html
  8. Carrie James, 2009 “Young People, Ethics and Digital Media”, Page 53, MIT Press
  9. Apple Co, (Press Release) 28th October 2007, “Led Zeppelin Digital Box Set…” http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007/10/23itunes.html
  10. Raymond Shih Ray Ku, 2001, “The Creative Destruction of Copyright: Napster and the New Economics od Digital Technology”, University of Chicago Law Review.
  11. Jeevan Jaisingh, 2004, “Piracy on file sharing networks: Stratergies for recording companies”, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology.
  12. Wired Magazine, 12.18.2007, “David Byrne and Thom Yorke on the Real Value of Music”, http://www.wired.com/entertainment/music/magazine/16-01/ff_yorke?currentPage=all#ixzz0jlXr4Ley

HTML Kit
Date Created: September 9, 2011  Date Modified: September 21, 2012

I have been using this HTML text editor since 2001, in the early days I used it alongside Dreamweaver, but now I use it as my primary editor. I have put so many prople onto this product, from enthusiasts to profesionals, to accademics. Try it out, it will be a welcome addition to your arsenal.

By the Time I Get to Arizona – FREE Mp3
Date Created: May 5, 2010  Date Modified: May 5, 2010

As mentioned prior, Chuck-D is no stranger to Digital Distribution, Mash-ups and getting political. On Public Enemy’s 1991 album “Apocalypse 91 – The Enemy Strikes Back” was a song titled: “By the time I get to Arizona”, it was comment on Senator John McCain’s opposition to recognizing Martin Luther King Day as a public holiday in the State of Arizona.

Recently Arizona’s come under fire for its border control, and the unprovoked beatings that citizens receive. I havnt followed the story closely, but in response DJ Spooky (who has worked with Chuck on projcets before) remixed the 19 year old (OMG Im old) PE classic and made it available for free (and totally LEGAL) download.

UPDATE

As all are well aware; the ABC radio station, tripple J, offer free mp3′s at their website. This week Sage Francis has a song avalible to download. Free music doesnt have to be illegal of unheard of. If you dig experimental hiphop I reccomend you give it a download.

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Image Correction Made Easy
Date Created: May 3, 2010  Date Modified: January 7, 2013

Curves, Historgam, Selective Colour, Replace Colour, Channel Mixer, Gamma, Brightness and Contrast–So many ways to correct colour in photoshoop, however as I am the worlds greatest photographer, I never need to use these… SURE!

I took this pic when I was still getting use to the DSLR, its of my friends dog whos name I cannot divulge. As you can tell its overexposed.

I used Gamma to make it look less washed out

This pic of Perth hip-hop MC Xzact, was one I took on 35mm back when I was doing intro to photography, the scan is too bright but I never knew untill I brought an LCD monitor.

I adjusted the black by using curves–now you can see the grainyness of the film, and how dirty my lense was.